Disney and Cameron Mackintosh's Mary Poppins
Everyone's favorite practically perfect nanny takes the stage in this Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious musical adventure.
Restrictions may apply for International Licensing.
Show Essentials
16
Roles
+ Ensemble
U
Rated
2
Acts

Full Synopsis

Act One

Bert, a man of many trades, informs us that something big is about to happen to the Banks family. At No. 17 Cherry Tree Lane, Jane and Michael Banks are constantly misbehaving, and Katie Nanna - the latest in a long line of nannies - has had enough ("Cherry Tree Lane"). She leaves, and George Banks asks his wife, Winifred, to place an advertisement in the newspaper for a new nanny, but the children decide to write their own ad ("The Perfect Nanny"). Mary Poppins arrives, and she fits the children's requirements exactly ("Practically Perfect").



Mary Poppins takes the children to the park, where they meet Bert, who is creating his latest works of art. Bored with the park and wary of Bert's scrappy appearance, the children try to escape, but Mary urges them to see the magic in everyday life. Then, the park bursts into brilliant colors and the statues come to life and dance with them ("Jolly Holiday").



As Mary Poppins begins to win over the children, George informs Winifred that they must maintain order and convention. Winifred feels that she is disappointing both her husband and children, and she struggles to understand her role within the family - and within the world ("Let's Hope She Will Stay"). The household prepares for Mrs. Banks' party (A Spoonful of Sugar), but even with a dose of magic from Mary Poppins, no one shows up. Mrs. Banks is left feeling more lost than ever.



Mary Poppins takes Jane and Michael on a trip to visit their father at his workplace, the bank ("Precision and Order"). There, George has a choice: to give a loan to Herr Von Hussler, a businessman with a dubious money-making scheme, or to John Northbrook, who presents a solid plan for a factory that would help many but offers little collateral. An innocent question from Jane prompts George to remember the ideals and values he once held ("A Man Has Dreams"). He decides to take a chance on Mr. Northbrook and gives him the loan.



On the way home from the bank, the children and Mary Poppins run into the Bird Woman, who is feeding the birds in front of St. Paul's Cathedral. Jane is still worried about outer appearances and shuns her, but Michael gives the Bird Woman money ("Feed the Birds").



Mary Poppins, Jane, Michael, and Bert meet Mrs. Corry, the mysterious owner of an unusual "talking shop," where people purchase words along with gingerbread. The children are surprised to hear that when their father was a boy, he came to this shop to enjoy its magic and spirit of invention ("Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious").



Things begin to go very wrong for George. Von Hussler goes to another bank and makes millions, and George is blamed for passing on the deal and is suspended without pay. In his stress, George yells at the children. In turn, an angry Jane and Michael fight over their toys, which magically come to life to teach them a lesson ("Playing the Game"). Recognizing the children are not yet ready for the lessons she has to teach them, Mary says goodbye to Bert ("Chim Chim Cher-ee"), leaving a note that reads, au revoir, or "till we meet again."

Act Two

The fall has turned to winter. The house is bustling again, because a nanny is returning to No. 17 Cherry Tree Lane. However, it's not the much-missed Mary Poppins, but Miss Andrew, who raised George. Miss Andrew is a harsh woman who believes that children should be punished on a regular basis with a horrible-tasting medicine ("Brimstone and Treacle"). In a panic, the children escape the house and run to the park where they meet Bert, who explains that the cure for every ill can be found at the end of a kite string ("Let's Go Fly a Kite"). Their kite flies up into the London sky and when it comes back down, Mary Poppins is with it. George has also been hiding from Miss Andrew ("Good for Nothing"). With her entire family missing, Winifred worries that she is to blame but resolves to assert herself and fight harder for the people she loves ("Being Mrs. Banks").



Mary returns home with the children and defeats Miss Andrew in an epic battle of wits and will. George returns, relieved to find that Miss Andrew has left, but still anxious about supporting his family. Winifred reminds him he can count on her and the children to stick by him.



Whisked up to the rooftops, Mary Poppins, Jane, and Michael meet Bert and his fellow chimney sweeps ("Step in Time"). The sweeps dance across the rooftops of London and into the Bankses' house, wishing good luck to George and shaking his hand as they go.



The Bank Chairman asks to see George immediately. George fears the worst, but Bert reminds him that his family is more important that his ambitions ("A Man Has Dreams - Reprise/A Spoonful of Sugar - Reprise"). George leaves for the bank. Winifred wishes she could go with him. Mary Poppins and the children encourage her to do what she believes right ("Anything Can Happen").



In front of the bank's board of directors, George launches into a defense of his actions before they can tell him that he was right all along: Von Hussler's scheme has fallen through and the competing bank that approved his loan has been ruined. Northbrook's business, on the other hand, is thriving and earning a healthy profit. Winifred shows up, ready to defend her husband, but when she finds the board is promoting him, she negotiates his raise for him. George announces that from now on his family comes first. As George and Winifred walk along the streets of London, Mary Poppins takes Jane and Michael on one more magical adventure - this time through the heavens.



Her job done, Mary Poppins says her goodbyes and flies off to her next task. Although the Banks family is sad to see her go, they are glad that they have finally found one another.

Casting

Casting

Cast Size: Flexible
Cast Type: Children
Dance Requirements: Standard

Character Breakdown

Bert
The narrator of the story, is a good friend to Mary Poppins. An everyman, Bert has many occupations, including hurdy-gurdy player, sidewalk artist and chimney sweep. Bert watches over the children as well as the goings on in Cherry Tree Lane. He has charm, speaks with a Cockney accent and is a song-and-dance man.
Gender: male
Age: 30 to 30
Vocal range top: F#4
Vocal range bottom: B2
George Banks
The father to Jane and Michael Banks, is a banker to the very fiber of his being. Demanding "precision and order" in his household, he is a pipe-and-slippers man who doesn't have much to do with his children and believes that he had the perfect upbringing by his nanny, the cruel Miss Andrew. His emotional armor, however, conceals a sensitive soul. A baritone, George may speak-sing as necessary.
Gender: male
Age: 40 to 40
Vocal range top: Eb4
Vocal range bottom: Bb2
Winifred Banks
George's wife and Jane and Michael's mother. A former actress, she is loving and distracted homemaker who is busy trying to live up to her husband's desire to obnly associate with "the best people" as well as be the model wife and mother. She suffers from the conflicting feelings that she's not up to the job of "being Mrs. Banks," yet, she is, and more. She has great warmth and simplicity to her tone.
Gender: female
Age: 30 to 30
Vocal range top: D5
Vocal range bottom: A3
Jane
The high-spirited daughter of Mr. and Mr. Banks, is bright and precocious but can be willful and inclined to snobbishness.
Gender: female
Age: 11 to 11
Vocal range top: F#5
Vocal range bottom: A3
Michael
The cute and cheeky son of Mr. and Mrs. Banks. Excitable and naughty, he adores his father and tries to be like him. Both he and Jane misbehave in order to get the attention of their parents.
Gender: male
Age: 9 to 9
Vocal range top: E5
Vocal range bottom: A3
Katie Nanna
Jane and Micahel's nanny at the beginning of the show. Overwhelmed and upset, she has absolutely had her fill of the Banks children.
Gender: female
Age: 30 to 30
Policeman
A neighborhood fixture who is respected by and observant of households on his beat.
Gender: male
Age: 30 to 30
Miss Lark
The haughty next-door neighbor of the Banks family who treats her dog, Willoughby, as if her were child.
Gender: female
Age: 30 to 30
Admiral Boom
A retired Royal Navy man and neighbor of the Banks family. A physically large man with a loud and booming voice, he speaks in Navy jargon and has a soft spot for his neighbor, Miss Lark. Can be any vocal range as needed. If Admiral Bloom doubles as the Banks Chairman, he can be a baritone.
Gender: male
Age: 50 to 50
Mrs. Brill
The housekeeper and cook for the Banks family. Overworked and harrassed, she's always complaining that the house is understaffed. Her intimidating exterior is a cover for the warmth underneath. Mrs. Brill doesn't have a high opinion of nannies in general and Mary Poppins in particular. She does not have to be a strong singer.
Gender: female
Age: 50 to 50
Vocal range top: D#5
Vocal range bottom: F#3
Robertson Ay
The houseboy to the Banks family. Lazy, sleepy and grumbling, he never gets things right and believes himself to be useless. He doesn't do a lot of singing, but his "Spoonful" solo can be a fun surprise.
Gender: male
Age: 20 to 20
Vocal range top: G#4
Vocal range bottom: F3
Mary Poppins
Jane and Michael Banks's new nanny. She is extraordinary and strange, neat and tidy, delightfully vain yet particular, and sometimes a little frightening but always exciting. She is practically perfect in every way and always means what she says. A mezzo soprano with strong top notes, she should be able to move well. She can have a more traditional soprano sound, but precision and diction is the key.
Gender: female
Age: 20 to 20
Vocal range top: C6
Vocal range bottom: Gb3
Park Keeper
Uniformed and officious, he makes sure no one breaks park regulations. His life is defined by rules, but he secretly hankers after his childhood.
Gender: male
Age: 40 to 40
Neleus
The statue of a young boy posed with a dolphin in the park. Neleus was separated from his father, Poseidon, and misses him very much. A small and lonely being, he is very happy to befriend Jane and Michael. This role is a wonderful opportunity to feature one of the strong dancers in your ensemble.
Gender: male
Age: 16 to 16
Queen Victoria
A statue in the park.
Gender: female
Age: 40 to 40
Bank Chairman
The head of the bank where Mr. Banks is employed, is an Edwardian stuffed-shirt. He can speak/sing his lines if necessary.
Gender: male
Age: 50 to 60
Vocal range top: D4
Vocal range bottom: C3
Miss Smythe
The Bank Chairman's humorless secretary.
Gender: female
Age: 40 to 40
Ensemble
Annie, Fannie, Valentine, Teddy Bear, Mr. Punch, Doll, Chimney Sweeps, Toys, Parkgoers.
Von Hussler
A businessman seeking a loan from the bank for a shady business deal. He speaks with a German accent.
Gender: male
Age: 30 to 30
John Northbrook
An honest business man seeking a loan to build a factory for his community. He speaks with an accent from Northern England.
Gender: male
Age: 30 to 30
Bird Woman
Covered in a patchwork of old shawls, and her pockets are stuffed with bags of crumbs for the birds. She tries to sell her crumbs for the birds. She tries to sell her crumbs to passersby, who ignore her as if she doesn't exist. Sings "Feed the Birds." There can be a gruff, folksy quality to her voice that relfelcts the hardness of her life.
Gender: female
Age: 50 to 50
Vocal range top: C5
Vocal range bottom: Gb3
Mrs. Corry
Owns a magical gingerbread shop. She is a mysterious woman of great age who speaks with a Caribbean accent (or any accent that would make her seem exotic).
Gender: female
Age: 40 to 40
Miss Andrew
George's overbearing and scary nanny. With her bottle of nasty-tasting brimstone and treacle to keep naughty children in line, she is a bully who only knows one way of doing things - her way. A soprano with an alto belt, there can be some heaviness to her voice along with range.
Gender: female
Age: 40 to 40
Vocal range top: F5
Vocal range bottom: Gb3
Full Song List
Mary Poppins: Prologue (Chim Chim Cher-ee)
Mary Poppins: Cherry Tree Lane (Part 1)
Mary Poppins: The Perfect Nanny
Mary Poppins: Cherry Tree Lane (Part 2 )
Mary Poppins: Practically Perfect
Mary Poppins: Jolly Holiday
Mary Poppins: Let's Hope She Will Stay
Mary Poppins: A Spoonful of Sugar
Mary Poppins: Precision and Order
Mary Poppins: Feed the Birds
Mary Poppins: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious
Mary Poppins: Playing the Game
Mary Poppins: Chim Chim Chre-ee (Reprise)
Mary Poppins: Brimstone and Treacle
Mary Poppins: Let's Go Fly a Kite
Mary Poppins: Good for Nothing [Cherry Tree Lane (Reprise)]
Mary Poppins: Being Mrs. Banks (Reprise)
Mary Poppins: Brimstone and Treacle (Part 2 )
Mary Poppins: A Chimney Swept (Chim Chim)/ Step in Time
Mary Poppins: A Man Had Dreams (Reprise)/ A Spoonful of Sugar (Reprise)
Mary Poppins: Anything Can Happen (Part 1)
Mary Poppins: A Spoonful of Sugar (Reprise)/ Finale
Mary Poppins: Bows/Supercal

Show History

Inspiration

Mary Poppins is a musical based on the book series by P.L. Travers of the same name and, more notably, the 1964 musical film starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke.  The stage show features many of the original songs made famous by the Oscar-winning duo of Richard and Robert Sherman, with additional music and lyrics from George Stiles and Anthony Drewe respectively, and a book by Julian Fellowes, creator for the television series Downton Abbey.

The genesis of the musical came at the hands of mega-producer Cameron Mackintosh (Les Misrables, Cats, Miss Saigon).  In 1993, he met with Pamela Travers, the author of the original book series, to get her permission to musicalize the stories of Mary Poppins.  When Travers agreed, he got in contact with Disney Theatrical in 2001, sparking a partnership that would allow the show to use music from the original movie.

Around 2002, Stiles and Drewe (Olivier winners for Honk!) had heard about the new collaboration, and wrote a demo song entitled "Practically Perfect" for the producers.  Once they listened to the song, they were brought onto the creative team.  Fellowes was then brought aboard for his "clear understanding of the social niceties of the English class system that prevailed in the Edwardian era."  Rounding off the production team for original production were director Sir Richard Eyre and Bob Crowley, a multi-Tony winner who had previously worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company, Royal Ballet,and Royal Opera.  A workshop of the musical was held at the end of 2003 at the Old Vic Theatre, using the cast from a recently-closed production of My Fair Lady.

The stage adaptation pulls some elements from the original book that were eliminated in the film, including the walking statue and the ladders to the stars.  Several scenes from the film were omitted, most notably the scenes of Uncle Albert laughing on the ceiling and the dancing penguins in "Jolly Holiday," which were replaced with dancing statues and a trip to Mrs. Corry's shop, respectively.  The musical generally places more emphasis on Jane and Michael being naughty children, and their parents having more of a dysfunctional relationship.  Mrs. Banks is no longer a suffragette, but a former actress, and Mr. Banks' back story is much more fleshed out.  A handful of musical sequences have also been placed in a different chronology, including bumping up "Let's Go Fly a Kite" to the middle of the show rather than the end.

Productions

Mary Poppins had its world premiere at the Bristol Hippodrome in London with a limited engagement from September 18 to November 6, 2004.  The production, starring Laura Michelle Kelly and Gavin Lee, then moved to the Prince Edward Theatre on December 15, running more than three years until January 12, 2008.  With a very successful production, the producers' eyes turned west, and the New Amsterdam Theatre housed the Broadway premiere on November 16, 2006.  Initially starring Broadway performer Ashley Brown and returning player Gavin Lee, it made minimal changes to the songs and staging.  After almost seven years of success, the Broadway production closed on March 3, 2013 to make room for Disney Theatricals' new production of Aladdin.

For the touring productions of the show, the sets were significantly reduced in size and intermediate scenes were removed to accommodate for smaller houses.  The first tour began in the UK on June 4, 2008, playing until April 18, 2009.  The US tour started in Chicago on March 25, 2009, featuring performances from the leads of the Broadway production Ashley Brown and Gavin Lee.  Like its Broadway equivalent, the tour was extremely successful, playing its last performance in Anchorage, Alaska on June 2, 2013.

Mary Poppins has also seen a significant amount of play outside of the UK and the US.  The first foreign-language production opened on October 18, 2008 in Goteburg, Sweden, performed entirely in Swedish.  Other locations for international productions include Finland, Mexico City, Australia, Japan, and France.  The first regional production of the musical was staged at the Dunfield Theatre Cambridge in Ontario, Canada.

Cultural Influence

  • Mary Poppins is the first Disney Theatrical show to open in the UK.  It is also the first show to open in collaboration with another theatre company.
  • Mary Poppins is currently the 30th longest-running show in Broadway history.
  • Mary Poppins was the first live-action Disney movie to be adapted to the stage.  Its success gave Disney Theatrical confidence to adapt other live-action films High School Musical, High School Musical 2, and Newsies.

Trivia

  • The West End production of Mary Poppins was nominated for eight additional Olivier Awards in 2005, including Best New Musical and Best Director.
  • The Broadway production of Mary Poppins was nominated for seven TONY Awards, including Best Musical and Best Choreography.  It was also nominated for six Drama Desk Awards (including Outstanding Musical, Outstanding Book of a Musical, and Outstanding Choreography), eleven Outer Critics Circle Awards (including Outstanding New Broadway Musical and Outstanding New Score), and a Drama League Award nomination for Distinguished Production of a Musical.
  • Celebrities that have starred in Mary Poppins (aside from those listed above) include:  Christian Borle (Bert), David Haig (George Banks), Scarlett Strallen (Mary), Gavin Creel (Bert), Philip Quast (George Banks), Lisa O'Hare (Mary), Robert Madge (Michael), Louise Gold (Miss Andrew/Miss Smythe), Rebecca Luker (Winifred Banks), Daniel Jenkins (George Banks), Jack Montgomery (Michael), Carrie Hope Fletcher (Jane), Aden Gillett (George Banks), Harry Stott (Michael), Jenny Galloway (Mrs. Brill), Linzi Hateley (Winifred Banks), Jane Carr (Mrs. Brill), Henry Hodges (Michael), Jonathan Freeman (Admiral Boom/Bank Chairman), Andrew Keenan-Bolger (Ensemble), Martin Ball (George Banks), Simon Burke (George Banks).

Critical Reaction

"Practically perfect" - The Journal News

"Nobody does magical entertainment like Disney except Cameron Mackintosh. The two have teamed up for a Mary Poppins that s a roof-raising, toe-tapping, high-flying extravaganza!" - New York Daily News

"Irresistible! A fresh fountain of youth that will make many a grown-up feel like a kid again!" - USA Today

"LOVELY [... ] Four stars! A super hit!" - New York Post

"The most bewitching thing to hover over a Broadway audience in years." - The Washington Post

"[An] entertaining narrative that both expands on the time-honored story from the film while largely reinventing it by going back to the source books of the late Pamela Travers." - Variety

Connect

Billing

A Musical based on the stories of P.L. Travers and the Walt Disney Film

Requirements

Under the terms and conditions of your organisation’s Performance Agreement, the following credits must appear on all advertising (including websites) relating to the production. Credits must be reproduced faithfully in accordance with the following layout. No alterations or deletions can be permitted unless stated below.
Percentages listed indicate required type size in relation to title size.

Licensee shall incorporate the following credits and comply with all size and other restrictions on the title page of all playbills and programs, and in all houseboards, displays and in all other advertising, press release and any other promotional material, except as otherwise provided below, as follows: 

The (Licensee) (50%)
Production of
Disney and Cameron Mackintosh’s (33 1/3 %)
MARY POPPINS (100%)
A Musical based on the stories of P.L. Travers (50%)
and the Walt Disney Film (50%)

Original Music and Lyrics by
Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (50%)
Book by
Julian Fellowes (50%)
New Songs and Additional Music and Lyrics by
George Stiles and Anthony Drewe (50%)
Co-Created by
Cameron Mackintosh (50%)
 
The Licensee Billing must be in the form specified above, including the words “Production of” below your billing, which shall be visually contiguous with the title, all so that the audience is informed that you are the producer. As specified above, your billing shall be no less than 50% of the size of the logo or artwork title, as measured by the proportion of the average size of your name to the largest letter in the logo or artwork title. The names “Disney and “Cameron Mackinstosh’s” above the title shall be in plain type font, shall be no more than 33 1/3% of the title, as measured by the proportion of the size of the “D” in “Disney” to the size of the largest letters in the title, and in no event may you duplicate the Broadway logo or title, nor the logo and title from the Walt Disney film “Mary Poppins” (the “Film”), unless you separately license the right to use the Broadway logo. If you do separately license the Broadway logo, then you shall duplicate such logo and billing credits exactly as provided, including the fonts.
 
(For professional licensees): If you elect not to purchase the Broadway logo, then you shall submit your logo or artwork title for approval prior to any public use thereof.  The size of the credit to the authors, P.L. Travers, the Walt Disney Film and Cameron Mackintosh shall be no less than 50% of the regular title, and if there is no regular title, then no less than 20% of the logo or artwork title. 
 

SHORTFORM BILLING FOR LEAFLETS AND CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS (Point sizes must be in same proportion as set forth for full billing above):

The (Licensee)
Production of
 
Disney and Cameron Mackintosh’s
MARY POPPINS
 
A Musical based on the stories of P.L. Travers
and the Walt Disney Film
 
The following credits shall be included in the program only on one of the two pages following the title page, in a box, and shall be no less than 40% of the regular title, and if there is no regular title, then no less than 16% of the logo or artwork title, and in all events 80% of the size of the credit to the authors, P.L. Travers, the Walt Disney Film, and Cameron Mackintosh as they appear on the title page: 
 
Original London and Broadway Production Credits:
 
Produced by
Cameron Mackintosh and Thomas Schumacher

Co-Choreographer

Lighting Design

 Stephen Mear

Howard Harrison

Scenic and Costume Design
Bob Crowley
 
Co-Direction and Choreography
Matthew Bourne
 
Directed by
Richard Eyre

Video Warning

If you purchase a separate Video Licence to allow non-commercial video recording of this production, you must print the following in your programme: ANY VIDEO RECORDING MADE OF THIS PERFORMANCE IS AUTHORISED FOR PERSONAL, AT-HOME, NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY. THE SALE OR DISTRIBUTION OF SUCH RECORDING IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED UNDER COPYRIGHT LAW. If you do not purchase a separate Video Licence then you must print the following in your programme: The videotaping or other video or audio recording of this production is strictly prohibited.

Included Materials

ItemQuantity Included
LIBRETTO/VOCAL BOOK28
PIANO VOCAL SCORE2
PRODUCTION HANDBOOK1
PROMOTIONAL ITEMS1
VIDEO SAMPLER1

Production Resources

Resource
ALT: FULL SCORE VOL 1 OF 4
ALT: FULL SCORE VOL 2 OF 4
ALT: FULL SCORE VOL 3 OF 4
ALT: FULL SCORE VOL 4 OF 4
CHOREOGRAPHY MANUAL
FULL SCORE VOL. 1 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 2 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 3 OF 4
FULL SCORE VOL. 4 OF 4
KEYBOARD PATCH SOLUTIONS
LOGO PACK
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT MEDIUM
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT SMALL
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT X-LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK ADULT XX-LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD LARGE
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD MEDIUM
LOGO TEES SIX-PACK CHILD SMALL
ORCHEXTRA
PARROT UMBRELLA (ADULT)
PERFORMANCE ACCOMPANIMENT REC.(OPT)
PERFORMANCE ACCOMPANIMENT RECORDING
PRODUCTIONPRO
REFERENCE RECORDING
REHEARSCORE+
SCENE PARTNER
STAGE MANAGER SCRIPT
VIDEO LICENSE
VIRTUAL STAGE MANAGER

STANDARD ORCHESTRATION: 16-PIECE ORCHESTRATION

InstrumentationDoubling
BASSACOUSTIC BASS , ELECTRIC BASS
CELLO
GUITARBANJO , ELECTRIC GUITAR , NYLON STRG ACOUSTIC , STEEL STRG ACOUSTIC
HORN
HORN 2
KEYBOARD 1
KEYBOARD 2
PERCUSSIONBELL TREE , BIRD WHISTLE , BOO BAMS , CABASA , CHIMES , CROTALES , GLOCKENSPIEL , GRAN CASSA , MARIMBA , MARIMBA/KALIMBA , MARK TREE , PIATTI , SUSPENDED CYMBAL , TAM TAM , TAMBOURINE , TIMPANI , TUBULAR BELLS , VIBES , WASHBOARD , XYLOPHONE
PERCUSSION 2BELL TREE , BONGOS , CLASH CYMBALS , COWBELL , CRICKET , CROTALES , CUICA , DRUM KIT , FINGER CYMBALS , GONG , GUIRO , LARGE TRIANGLE , MARK TREE , MEDIUM TRIANGLE , METAL RATTLE , PIATTI , PICCOLO WOOD BLOCK , RATCHET , RODS (ON HI HAT) , SHIP'S BELL , SMALL GONG , SMALL TRIANGLE , SPOONS , SUSPENDED CYMBAL , TAMBOURINE , TEMPLE BLOCKS , TOY DRUM , WHIP , WIND CHIMES , WIND MACHINE , WOODBLOCKS
PIANO CONDUCTOR'S SCORE ACT 1
PIANO CONDUCTOR'S SCORE ACT 2
REED 1ALTO RECORDER IN F , FLUTE , PICCOLO
REED 2ENGLISH HORN , HARMONICA , OBOE
REED 3Bb CLARINET , BASS CLARINET , Eb CLARINET
TROMBONEEUPHONIUM , TROMBONE
TROMBONE 2BASS TROMBONE , TROMBONE , TUBA
TRUMPETCORNET , FLUGELHORN , TRUMPET
TRUMPET 2CORNET , FLUGELHORN , TRUMPET

ALTERNATE ORCHESTRATION: 11-PIECE ORCHESTRATION

InstrumentationDoubling
ALT: BASS
ALT: CELLO
ALT: HORN 1
ALT: HORN 2
ALT: PC ACT 1
ALT: PC ACT 2
ALT: PERCUSSION
ALT: PIANO 1/KEYBOARD 1
ALT: PIANO 2/KEYBOARD 2
ALT: REED 1 FLUTE , PICCOLO
ALT: REED 2 Bb CLARINET , BASS CLARINET , Eb CLARINET
ALT: TROMBONE
ALT: TRUMPET CORNET , FLUGELHORN , TRUMPET